Interactive Body Map

Adductors/Groinx

This area is home to the adductor muscle group (magnus, longus, and brevis), as well as, the sartorious muscle and the gracilis. It is also home to the Pes Anserine. Common injuries here include muscles strains and tendon injuries.

Adductors/Groinx

This area is home to the adductor muscle group (magnus, longus, and brevis), as well as, the sartorious muscle and the gracilis. It is also home to the Pes Anserine. Common injuries here include muscles strains and tendon injuries.

Anterior Hip (Left)x

This area consists of the hip flexors (iliopsoas and illiacus), the rectus femoris (part of the quads), the sartorious, and internal hip rotators. Common injuries that happen here include muscles strains and tendon injuries.

Anterior Hip (Right)x

This area consists of the hip flexors (iliopsoas and illiacus), the rectus femoris (part of the quads), the sartorious, and internal hip rotators. Common injuries that happen here include muscles strains and tendon injuries.

Anterior Shoulder (Left)x

The front of the shoulder consists of not only the superficial pectoral and deltoid muslces but also a deeper layer of muscles hidden beneath them. Injuries here include impingement and damage of the rotator cuff and biceps tendons, as well as, bursitis, and scapular imbalances.

Anterior Shoulder (Right)x

The front of the shoulder consists of not only the superficial pectoral and deltoid muslces but also a deeper layer of muscles hidden beneath them. Injuries here include impingement and damage of the rotator cuff and biceps tendons, as well as, bursitis, and scapular imbalances.

Bicep (Left)x

The upper arm consists of the muscles that bend and straighten the elbow, namely the large bicep and tricep muscles. It also includes the deeper brachialis and brachioradialis, as well as the muscles that rotate the forearm. Common injuries in this area include muscle strains and tendon injuries.

Bicep (Right)x

The upper arm consists of the muscles that bend and straighten the elbow, namely the large bicep and tricep muscles. It also includes the deeper brachialis and brachioradialis, as well as the muscles that rotate the forearm. Common injuries in this area include muscle strains and tendon injuries.

Calf (Left)x

The calf muscles provide control and balance as you move over your foot/ankle from double to single leg stance, and assist in propulsion as you push off of your toes at the end of the gait cycle. With that in mind, they are a common source of problems in the lower extremities. Tight calf muscles can lead to problems both in the foot and shin, as well as, up the chain into the knee, hip, and back. Common injuries here include Achilles injuries, gastroc and soleus strains, as well as, posterior tibialis injuries.

Calf (Left)x

The calf muscles provide control and balance as you move over your foot/ankle from double to single leg stance, and assist in propulsion as you push off of your toes at the end of the gait cycle. With that in mind, they are a common source of problems in the lower extremities. Tight calf muscles can lead to problems both in the foot and shin, as well as, up the chain into the knee, hip, and back. Common injuries here include Achilles injuries, gastroc and soleus strains, as well as, posterior tibialis injuries.

Calf (Right)x

The calf muscles provide control and balance as you move over your foot/ankle from double to single leg stance, and assist in propulsion as you push off of your toes at the end of the gait cycle. With that in mind, they are a common source of problems in the lower extremities. Tight calf muscles can lead to problems both in the foot and shin, as well as, up the chain into the knee, hip, and back. Common injuries here include Achilles injuries, gastroc and soleus strains, as well as, posterior tibialis injuries.

Calf (Right)x

The calf muscles provide control and balance as you move over your foot/ankle from double to single leg stance, and assist in propulsion as you push off of your toes at the end of the gait cycle. With that in mind, they are a common source of problems in the lower extremities. Tight calf muscles can lead to problems both in the foot and shin, as well as, up the chain into the knee, hip, and back. Common injuries here include Achilles injuries, gastroc and soleus strains, as well as, posterior tibialis injuries.

Foot (Left)x

The foot is home to four unique layers of muscles that work together to provide shock absorption when our foot hits the ground and then propulsion when we push off of it. If there is any disruption in this process (due to tight muscles or joints for example), it is very common for the small structures to break down under the load of the body. Some examples of injuries that can occur include plantar fasciitis, heel spurs, sesamoiditis, neuromas and bunions.

Foot (Right)x

The foot is home to four unique layers of muscles that work together to provide shock absorption when our foot hits the ground and then propulsion when we push off of it. If there is any disruption in this process (due to tight muscles or joints for example), it is very common for the small structures to break down under the load of the body. Some examples of injuries that can occur include plantar fasciitis, heel spurs, sesamoiditis, neuromas and bunions.

Forearm/Wrist (Left)x

This area consists of the muscles that bend and straighten the wrist and fingers, as well as, rotate the forearm. Common injuries include muscle strains, tendon injuries, and the more popular lateral and medial epicondylitis (aka tennis and golfers elbow).

Forearm/Wrist (Left)x

This area consists of the muscles that bend and straighten the wrist and fingers, as well as, rotate the forearm. Common injuries include muscle strains, tendon injuries, and the more popular lateral and medial epicondylitis (aka tennis and golfers elbow).

Forearm/Wrist (Right)x

This area consists of the muscles that bend and straighten the wrist and fingers, as well as, rotate the forearm. Common injuries include muscle strains, tendon injuries, and the more popular lateral and medial epicondylitis (aka tennis and golfers elbow).

Forearm/Wrist (Right)x

This area consists of the muscles that bend and straighten the wrist and fingers, as well as, rotate the forearm. Common injuries include muscle strains, tendon injuries, and the more popular lateral and medial epicondylitis (aka tennis and golfers elbow).

Hamstrings (Left)x

This area includes the back of the thigh and the three hamstring muscles- the semimembranosus, the semitendonosis, and the biceps femoris. Injuries here can occur within the muscles themselves or in the tendons where they attach to the bone.

Hamstrings (Right)x

This area includes the back of the thigh and the three hamstring muscles- the semimembranosus, the semitendonosis, and the biceps femoris. Injuries here can occur within the muscles themselves or in the tendons where they attach to the bone.

Hand (Left)x

This area consists of the all the little muscles that move the fingers and thumb. Common injuries in the hand include muscle strain/sprains, tendon injuries, and even nerve injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

Hand (Left)x

This area consists of the all the little muscles that move the fingers and thumb. Common injuries in the hand include muscle strain/sprains, tendon injuries, and even nerve injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

Hand (Right)x

This area consists of the all the little muscles that move the fingers and thumb. Common injuries in the hand include muscle strain/sprains, tendon injuries, and even nerve injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

Hand (Right)x

This area consists of the all the little muscles that move the fingers and thumb. Common injuries in the hand include muscle strain/sprains, tendon injuries, and even nerve injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

Lateral Hip/ITB (Left)x

This area consists of the muscles and structures on the outside of the hip and thigh. They include the Iliotibial or IT Band, the Gluteus Medius/Minimus, and the Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL). Common injuries here include muscle strains and ITBS (iliotibial band syndrome).

Lateral Hip/ITB (Left)x

This area consists of the muscles and structures on the outside of the hip and thigh. They include the Iliotibial or IT Band, the Gluteus Medius/Minimus, and the Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL). Common injuries here include muscle strains and ITBS (iliotibial band syndrome).

Lateral Hip/ITB (Right)x

This area consists of the muscles and structures on the outside of the hip and thigh. They include the Iliotibial or IT Band, the Gluteus Medius/Minimus, and the Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL). Common injuries here include muscle strains and ITBS (iliotibial band syndrome).

Lateral Hip/ITB (Right)x

This area consists of the muscles and structures on the outside of the hip and thigh. They include the Iliotibial or IT Band, the Gluteus Medius/Minimus, and the Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL). Common injuries here include muscle strains and ITBS (iliotibial band syndrome).

Low Backx

This area is home to the large muscles of the low back including the paraspinals (erector spinae group and the multifidus), as well as, the quadratus lumborum and larger overlapping latissimus dorsi muscles. Common injuries here include muscle strains and sprains, as well as, more severe spine and nerve injuries.

Mid Backx

This area contains the paraspinal muscles (erector spinae group and the multifidus) as they move up the back, as well as, the interscapular/between the shoulder blade muscles (rhomboids and trapezius). Common injuries here include muscle strains/sprains, spasms and nerve injuries.

Neck (Back)x

This area contains the upper end of the paraspinal muscles, the levator scapulae, upper trapezius and scalenes. It is a busy region full of intersecting muscles and nerves working to move the shoulder as well as the neck. Common injuries include muscle sprains, strains, spasms and nerve pinches.

Neck (Front)x

This area contains the upper end of the paraspinal muscles, the levator scapulae, upper trapezius and scalenes. It is a busy region full of intersecting muscles and nerves working to move the shoulder as well as the neck. Common injuries include muscle sprains, strains, spasms and nerve pinches.

Posterior Hip (Left)x

This area consists of the muscles in posterior hip/glute region. This includes the gluteus maximus and the external rotators that lie beneath it (aka the piriformis muscle, gemelli muscles, obturator externus, quadratus femoris). Common injuries include muscle strains, sprains, and even nerve injuries.

Posterior Hip (Right)x

This area consists of the muscles in posterior hip/glute region. This includes the gluteus maximus and the external rotators that lie beneath it (aka the piriformis muscle, gemelli muscles, obturator externus, quadratus femoris). Common injuries include muscle strains, sprains, and even nerve injuries.

Posterior Shoulder (Left)x

This area contains the superficial trapezius and deltoid muscles, as well as, the deeper rotator cuff and teres major. Common injuries include muscle strains, sprains, and tendon injuries.

Posterior Shoulder (Right)x

This area contains the superficial trapezius and deltoid muscles, as well as, the deeper rotator cuff and teres major. Common injuries include muscle strains, sprains, and tendon injuries.

Quads/Knee (Left)x

This area contains the four quadricep muscles (rectus femoris/RF, vastus intermedius/VI, vastus lateralis/VL, and vastus medialis oblique/VMO), the patella/knee cap, and patellar tendon. Injuries can occur up in the muscles themselves or down in the knee cap. Some examples include: Quad strains, patellar tendinitis, patellofemoral syndrome (PFS) and chondromalacia (CMP).

Quads/Knee (Right)x

This area contains the four quadricep muscles (rectus femoris/RF, vastus intermedius/VI, vastus lateralis/VL, and vastus medialis oblique/VMO), the patella/knee cap, and patellar tendon. Injuries can occur up in the muscles themselves or down in the knee cap. Some examples include: Quad strains, patellar tendinitis, patellofemoral syndrome (PFS) and chondromalacia (CMP).

Shin Outer Leg (Left)x

This area contains muscles that run from the top of your foot all the way up the front of your shin (extensor hallicus, extensor digitorum and anterior tibialis), as well as, the peroneal muscles running from your outside ankle bone/arch all the way up to your knee. Common injuries in this area include peroneal tendinitis and shin splints.

Shin Outer Leg (Right)x

This area contains muscles that run from the top of your foot all the way up the front of your shin (extensor hallicus, extensor digitorum and anterior tibialis), as well as, the peroneal muscles running from your outside ankle bone/arch all the way up to your knee. Common injuries in this area include peroneal tendinitis and shin splints.

Tricep (Left)x

The upper arm consists of the muscles that bend and straighten the elbow, namely the large bicep and tricep muscles. It also includes the deeper brachialis and brachioradialis, as well as the muscles that rotate the forearm. Common injuries in this area include muscle strains and tendon injuries.

Tricep (Right)x

The upper arm consists of the muscles that bend and straighten the elbow, namely the large bicep and tricep muscles. It also includes the deeper brachialis and brachioradialis, as well as the muscles that rotate the forearm. Common injuries in this area include muscle strains and tendon injuries.

How to use the body map

To use the interactive map you have two option. The first is to simply click the map itself in the area you want to work on. When an area is highlighted a box will pop up describing the structures in that area. The second option is to use the quick regions view. When you click on this option, you will be given a written list of the areas to choose from.

Once you have chosen your region you will be taken to an overview page. Here you will find the courses available to you. Each course will include the five parts of the ATA self treatment system, as well as, a plan to put them all together.

As the site grows there will be three levels of courses in each region:

  1. basic: these courses will teach you the techniques for that immediate area.
  2. intermediate: these courses are more complex and include a larger, total body focus.
  3. advanced: these courses are the most specific and will focus on specific injuries.